About the beer

Bierstadt blonde ale

Blonde Ale

Easy drinking, mild, low ABV. The perfect blonde to spend the afternoon with. Anyone new to craft beer would feel comfortable with this gateway brew. She reminds you of the lagers you typically choose at your local dive bar but there is something more that stays with you after that last sip. It will bring you back for more.

About the Mountain:

Mount Bierstadt – Front Range

Ranked 40th out of 58 at 14,060 feet – Elevation gain: 2,850 – Distance: 7 miles – Rating: Moderate, Class 2

In 1914, the peak was named in honor of renowned western landscape painter, Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902), who visited Mount Evans in 1863 and “may well have made the first ascents of both Mount Evans and Mount Bierstadt“. Bierstadt immortalized Mount Evans in his famous 12-foot x 7-foot oil painting “Storm in the Rocky Mountains,” dated 1866.

Sunlight Saison/Mountain berry saison

Belgian Saison

This traditional farmhouse-ale originated in the agrarian French-speaking regions of Belgium. Traditionally light in color, mild and high in carbonation, this style was brewed for working-class villagers, farmers and seasonal farm hands. Perfect for the families of Garden Oaks!! (Our Mountain Berry Saison adds blueberries and blackberries to our saison for a sassy alternative)

About the Mountain:

Sunlight Peak– San Juan Range

Ranked 42nd out of 58 at 14,059 feet – Elevation gain: 6,000 – Distance: 5 miles – Rating : Very Difficult, Class 4

When the Hayden Survey topographer Franklin Rhoda viewed the Needle Mountains from a distance in 1874, he wrote that the range always gave his companions a feeling of uneasiness when they observed the frequent storm clouds hovering around the pointy summits. Sunlight was named by the U.S. Geological Survey when they mapped the Needles Mountains in 1902.

Castle pale ale

Pale Ale

An earthy, crisp British style pale ale with a light, malt background. Brewed with pale malt and ale yeast, our pale ale bridges the gap between our blonde and saison and our darker porter and stout. It is full of flavor, but not too heavy. The style is very approachable.

About the Mountain:

Castle Peak – Elk Mountains

Ranked 12th out of 58 at 14,265 feet – Elevation gain: 4,600 – Distance: 13.5 miles – Rating: Difficult, Class 2

The Hayden U.S. Government Survey of 1874 named this peak for the striking towers along its ridges. Ferdinand V. Hayden, M.D. conducted a comprehensive geological survey of Colorado in the 1870s and was responsible for naming a number of Colorado’s 14ers.

Crestone ESB/slowpokes esb

Traditional British Extra Special Bitter

We use a slate of British malts including Maris Otter, medium and medium dark crystal all sourced from the UK in our extra special bitter. While we don’t import the waters from Burton upon Trent, we do take care to adjust our water’s chemistry to replicate the mineral profile of this iconic water. Three traditional British hops including Fuggles, Challenger and East Kent Goldings give it that good English aroma and taste. (We also pair this ESB with Slowpokes cold brew coffee for a fine coffee/beer hybrid with a low ABV. A perfect morning choice)

About the Mountain:

Crestone Peak – Sangre de Cristo Range

Ranked 7th out of 58 at 14,294 feet – Elevation gain: 5,700 – Distance: 14 miles – Rating: Very Difficult, Class 3

Some time before 1853, trappers and traders entered the San Luis Valley (west of the Crestones) and saw some resemblance between the Crestone Group (The Needle, the Peak, and Kit Carson) and the three Tetons of Wyoming, which were the best known mountains of the west. Thus, the Crestone Group is called the Trois Tetons on the Wheeler Survey’s maps of 1877 and 1879.

Massive Brown Porter

Traditional British Porter

Our brown porter combines British Maris Otter and German Vienna malts with Belgian chocolate and German medium crystal  malts to give it a rich brown color. Not as dark as a stout, just “massively brown”. Flaked barley adds a good head to any pour.

About the Mountain:

Mount Massive – Sawatch Range

Ranked 2nd out of 58 at 14,421 feet – Elevation gain 4,500 – Distance: 14.5 miles – Rating: Moderate, Class 2

The mountain was named for its shape and size, and was known by its current name before 1873. The Hayden and Wheeler U.S. Government Surveys both referred to the mountain as Mt. Massive. Over the years, there have been numerous unsuccessful attempts to change the mountain’s name from Massive to alternatives such as McKinley, Gannett, or Churchill.

Sneffels Black & Blueberry Milk Stout

Berry Infused Imperial Milk Stout

Our milk stout is darker, sweeter and stronger than our porter. The blackberries and blueberries included in the conditioning give it a subtle accent of two of our favorite berries we picked as kids during our summer visits to central Michigan and northern Oregon growing up.

About the Mountain:

Mount Sneffels – San Juan Range

Ranked 29th out of 58 at 14,150 feet – Elevation gain: 2,950 – Distance: 6.5 miles – Rating: Easy, Class 3

Standing in Blue Lakes Basin beneath the mountain, early climbers compared the dramatic abyss to the great hole in the earth through which Arne Saknussemm reached the center of the earth in Jules Verne’s 1864 novel, “Journey to the Center of the Earth.” Endlich agreed with this analogy and, pointing to the great peak above the abyss, exclaimed, “There’s Snaefell!”, referring to the Icelandic mountain that rose above the hole in the earth in Verne’s novel. This original name was pronounced by the local residents as “Sneffels”–a misnomer that found its way onto later maps and survives today.

Conundrum Grapefruit IPA

Traditional India Pale Ale infused with Grapefruit Zest

What can supercharge a double IPA more than an overloaded portion of hops? Grapefruit zest of course. We use a healthy portion of zest in the boil and fermentation process. This provides a unique, complementary grapefruit essence to both the aroma and taste of each pint.

About the Mountain:

Conundrum Peak – Elk Range

Ranked 41st out of 58 at 14,060 feet – Elevation gain: 4,850 – Distance: 14.5 miles Rating: Difficult, Class 2

The mountain’s name, which denotes a paradoxical, insoluble, or difficult problem, comes from the creek and hot springs of the same name found nearby. Prospectors originally named the creek after finding traces of gold and following the stream upward to its source in a fruitless search for the Mother Lode.

Blanca Witbier IPA

German Wheat Beer brewed with Coriander and an extra dose of Hops

White beer (called Witbier in Flemish) is a wheat-style ale from the farming region east of Brussels.  Brewed with Pilsner and wheat malt with flaked wheat to add an extra dose of haze and flavor “sharpness”. Coriander provides a complex nutty and citrus flavor. We then use more than our fair share of Willamette, Cascade and Citra hops to supercharge the bitterness levels to nearly four times the normal wheat beer style.

About the Mountain:

Blanca Peak – Sangre de Cristo Range

Ranked 4th out of 53 at 14,345 feet – Elevation gain: 6,500 – Distance: 17 miles – Rating : Difficult, Class 2

“Sierra Blanca” (Spanish for “white sawtooth mountains”) is used to designate the group of peaks that includes Blanca Peak, Little Bear Peak, Ellingwood Point, and Mt. Lindsey. The name probably refers to the snow that perpetually covers the tops of the highest peaks. Sierra Blanca was used to refer to this sub-range of the Sangre de Cristos as early as 1853, when Lieutenant E.G. Beckwith mentioned it in his report of the Gunnison Expedition. Blanca Peak is the name given to the highest summit of this group of mountains.

Longs Peach NEIPA

Mosaic NEIPA

Longs Peach has no peach!! The peach essence we strive for is invoked by the interaction of our Mosaic hops and the yeast we use. Longs Peach earned its name because of our experience climbing Longs Peak in our youth. After a full day of climbing to the summit, we were exhausted and starving. The only food we had to eat was a crushed peach at the bottom of our pack. Best peach ever!!

About the Mountain:

Long Peak – Front Range

Ranked 7th out of 58 at 14,255 feet – Elevation gain: 5,100 – Distance: 14.5 miles – Rating: Difficult, Class 3

Longs Peak is a prominent mountain summit in the northern Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The fourteener is located in the Rocky Mountain National Park Wilderness, 9.6 miles southwest of Estes Park. Longs Peak is the northmost “fourteener” in the Rocky Mountains and the highest point in Boulder County. The mountain takes its name from Major Stephen H. Long (1784-1864), whose expedition made the first recorded sighting of the peak on June 30, 1820.

Humboldt Hazy

Citra NEIPA

This version of our New England style IPA is heavily dry hopped with Citra Cryo and mashed in at a higher temperature to reduce the target ABV just enough to make it an easy drinker.

About the Mountain:

Humboldt Peak – Sangre de Cristo

Ranked 39th out of 58 at 14,064 feet – Elevation gain: 4,200 – Distance 11.0 miles – Rating: Moderate, Class 2

In 1874, Leonard Frederick discovered a vein of silver on the west slope of the Wet Mountain Valley. He constructed a mine to excavate the ore, and for many years the immigrants of the valley worked there for a sizeable profit. Frederick called his mine the Humboldt, in honor of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), eminent German geographer, explorer, and mountaineer. The immigrants of the valley gave the mountain above the mine the same name.

San Luis Simpaticoe

Simcoe and Cascade NEIPA

Our third edition of our NEIPA utilizes Simcoe hops. Simcoe includes hints of citrus, passion fruit, apricot, and berry. It also has the essence of pine and earthy scents that remind us of our Rocky Mountain roots. They provide a complex alternative slightly dryer than our other NEIPAs.

About the Mountain:

San Luis Peak – San Juan Mountains

Ranked 54th out of 58 at 14,014 feet – Elevation gain: 3,600 – Distance13.5 miles – Rating: Easy, Class 1

The mountain’s name, which first appeared on Hayden’s 1877 Atlas of Colorado, is probably taken from the name of the valley that lies at its base. The valley was named by an early unknown Spanish explorer, the patron saint of whose village was San Luis.